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Transform yourself to transform your organization

Posted by on April 25, 2016 9:38 am

All organizations need to transform in order to grow. When we reach the top of the business curve and business is good, we’re tempted to settle in for the long haul after the hard climb up. We want to get comfortable and we feel confident as we pat ourselves on the back for making it: “Let’s keep doing what we’re doing, because it works!”

Actually, this is the best time to kick ourselves in the butt and say – what’s going to work next?! It’s a great time to build a new strategy, revamp products, or shift the market. It’s also the perfect time to look at yourself as a leader. If you want your organization to transform and grow, you have to carve out the time for your own transformation.

As Carol Dweck talks about in her book “Mindset”, leaders with a “growth mindset” are the ones that successfully grow their companies to greatness:

[These leaders] are constantly trying to improve. They surround themselves with the most able people they can find, they look squarely at their own mistakes and deficiencies, and they ask frankly what skills they and the company will need in the future.

These are the partnerships we love to create with our clients. Helping leaders get real with themselves on what it’s going to take from them to elevate their company to the next level is exciting stuff. As Stanford Graduate School of Business lecturer Mark Leslie pointed out in a recent article, “Vision doesn’t matter if a leader doesn’t have the audacity to pursue it.”

So, why should you enlist the help of an executive coach to assist in your transformation as a business leader? From my experience working with executives, here are just a few ways a coach can help:

1. Time to get real (with yourself). A trusted partner in your leadership growth will help you gain a true understanding of the strengths you need to keep bringing to the table — and the things you need to stop bringing to the table. A coach works with you to tackle those things that may be slowing your growth into manageable actions to work on.

2. Focus, focus, focus. It’s so easy to get caught up in the day to day responsibilities of running a company and lose focus on the big picture of strategic direction. Partnering with a coach helps you transform the way you focus on a daily basis so that you execute a larger vision for your career.

3. Outside eyes. As you push the limits of status quo, having a coach that understands your business, your leadership, and your team will provide you with a fresh set of eyes. The opportunity to bounce new ideas off of a trusted, unbiased third party who has your best interests in mind is invaluable.

Partnering with a coach is not something to be embarrassed or ashamed of. In fact, partnering with a coach is one of the best ways to truly transform yourself. And if you really want to take your business to the next level, your own transformation will be key.

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Don’t forget the introverts in your next innovation project

Posted by on March 28, 2016 12:37 pm
Team

An indisputable key to a successful innovation project is the diversity of the project team members. The power of diversity is in the varying experiences and ideas each team member brings to the table. Different perspectives generate better and more varied ideas, ultimately creating more successful outcomes.

“Diversity” can mean different things to different people though. In case of an innovation project, we mean diversity in every sense of the word: team members should hold different positions in the organization and at different levels in different departments; the team should be composed of varying ethnicities, backgrounds, lifestyles, and demographics. The more diverse, the better!

One factor that may be overlooked though? The balance of extroverts and introverts on your innovation team. If you believe that the team is strengthened by including only those employees who are more extroverted (“She’s always talking – she’d be great for our team!”), it’s time to reconsider.

According to the Quiet Leadership Institute, 50% of the U.S. workforce self-identifies as introverts. 64% of workers believe their organization does not fully harness the talents of the introverted employees. What’s more, 96% of leaders and managers self-identify as extroverts—which means leadership teams are often imbalanced and do not fairly represent a diverse workforce. It becomes all the more important, then, to be purposeful when choosing your innovation project team members.

Introverts can contribute just as fully to the innovation team as any other member, given the right conditions. Here’s three ways to make sure that happens:Team

  1. Create a safe environment. When encouraged, introverts can become extroverted. In a supportive and open team atmosphere, introverts are more likely to share their ideas. Ensuring that everyone feels comfortable and “safe” with their team means that you’re more likely to hear from the quieter members of the group — especially important during the idea generation phases.
  1. Make writing just as important as speaking. In Innovation Engineering projects, writing is strongly encouraged. In fact, everything is documented by the participants. For example, during a Create session (designed to maximize idea generation), team members use Yellow Cards to outline and flush out their idea more fully. While some participants will read their Yellow Cards out to the rest of team, others may choose not to. Regardless, each idea is captured on a Yellow Card, all of which are collected during the session and available for all team members to read. This means that ideas aren’t silenced because of a fear of public speaking.
  1. Make sure everyone has a responsibility. During the rapid cycles of learning phase of the Innovation Engineering process, the team meets weekly to test, build, and sometimes kill ideas. At those meetings, team members are assigned pieces to work on (for example, I might be responsible for researching popular coffee brewing methods if our team is trying to learn more about worldwide coffee consumption). Before the next meeting, I’m responsible for doing my research and entering the information into the online project portal. And at the meeting itself, I share my findings with the team. By assigning specific tasks, team members assume ownership and become the “expert” on that particular piece. Reporting back to the team at the weekly meeting is not a presentation; it’s the sharing of information, which makes all the difference to an introvert.

While introverts may be the quieter members of your innovation team, their contributions can speak volumes. Starting with as diverse a team as possible, creating a safe environment for sharing, valuing writing as much as talking, and making every team member accountable means better ideas, a more productive team, and in the end, more meaningfully unique innovations. Results like that are something to cheer about (quietly, please).

 

 

 

An indisputable key to a successful innovation project is the diversity of the project team members. The power of diversity is in the varying experiences and ideas each team member brings to the table. Different perspectives generate better and more varied ideas, ultimately creating more successful outcomes.

“Diversity” can mean different things to different people though. In case of an innovation project, we mean diversity in every sense of the word: team members should hold different positions in the organization and at different levels in different departments. The team should be composed of varying ethnicities, backgrounds, lifestyles, and demographics. The more diverse, the better!

One factor that may be overlooked though? The balance of extroverts and introverts on your innovation team. If you believe that the team is strengthened by including only those employees who are more extroverted (“She’s always talking – she’d be great for our team!”), it’s time to reconsider.

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The power of rapid cycles of learning

Posted by on March 15, 2016 8:19 am
PDSA Cycle

Recently, I had the opportunity to be one of four judges at the semi-final stage of a business case competition that hosted MBA and Ph.D students from some of the most prestigious universities across Canada and the US. As part of the process, students were asked to submit a written business plan to judges ahead of a thirty-minute presentation and question period.

I had the good fortune of being assigned to the medical products subgroup and judging panel which included three incredibly talented professionals with backgrounds in finance, intellectual property law, and medical research.

Each business plan featured a meaningfully unique product that could help make a difference in our health and our world. Plans included detailed financials, and all four teams had taken steps to protect their intellectual property.

That being said, there were two areas where I saw challenges with their plans. Interestingly, they are the same challenges that many organizations have when they consider new innovations:

1. A mistaken belief that research always needs big dollar and time investments.

All of the business presentations we saw included a request for a capital raise, in part to fund additional research and clinical trials. What I learned from talking to my judge colleagues (with backgrounds in capital funding and medical research), was that smaller, faster tests could be performed prior to requiring large investments for major clinical trials. These smaller, faster, cheaper tests could help further prove out concepts before approaching potential investors, while still progressing ideas closer towards FDA approval.

2. Financials built on assumptions rather than on learning.

As a consequence of limited testing, the financials in the business plans were built on several assumptions. As judges we found ourselves questioning revenue projections, expenses and how teams arrived at their company valuations. While we couldn’t expect perfect financials, the use of math modelling to create more realistic financial projections would have strengthened each business case.

The best way to address both issues? Use the power of rapid cycles of learning to get smarter.

Rapid cycles of learning are designed to identifyPDSA Cycle

  • WHAT we need to learn about;
  • Create a PLAN to learn quickly;
  • DO what we need to in order to learn;
  • STUDY the results from our test(s), and
  • ACT appropriately based on the learning.

At inVision, we focus on one-week learning cycles as part of the Innovation Engineering system. If we are going to fail, we want to fail fast and fail cheap, instead of investing time and money in large scale studies without solid evidence that our concept works.

So, what could innovative organizations and these business case students do to strengthen their potential for successful launch?

1. Identify the death threats for the concept and prioritize them.

What are the top threats to your idea? Identify those factors that could derail your idea and prioritize them. For example, all of the groups saw that FDA approval was critical, and they put that at the top of their priority list. Lower on the priority list was comfort for the patient. I argued that both were equally important. And while they certainly couldn’t deal with all of the FDA research in one week, they could test the comfort factor of their prototypes to ensure patients could tolerate them. The key here? Do what you can to test your idea!

2. Identify fail fast, fail cheap opportunities to learn quickly.

Look for the simplest and most cost effective test to push concepts to the limit. As you continue to ‘pass the tests’, build on the test complexity. For example, in the instance of patient comfort, the students could set up prototypes for friends and family to ‘try’ and then offer their feedback. This wouldn’t replace required testing for FDA approval, but it would answer some critical questions for potential investors and remove a risk. By the time you need significant investment for legislated approvals, you should have enough proof of concept to reduce anxiety for potential investors.

3. Learn as you go: Adjust your product concept and math models based on your learning.

Every learning cycle allows you to learn something you can apply to your concept. After every cycle, re-evaluate! The cycles should help you get smarter every time, refining your concept as you go. If not, you may not be focusing on the most important death threats. The fewer assumptions you make in your plan because you have proved out concepts, the stronger your plan and the more likely that you will execute on time and within budget. Strong financials also help secure investors because it provides confidence in the management/leadership team as well as the concept.

I’m certainly not a medical professional, but I learned a lot about medical devices over the last week. This experience reinforced to me that no matter the industry and no matter the concept, it is valuable to use rapid cycles of learning to strengthen an innovation. Break down imaginary barriers and do what you can to prove out your concept, and then move to the next stage of funding and longer term testing to continue your journey.

 

 

 

Recently, I had the opportunity to be one of four judges at the semi-final stage of a business case competition that hosted MBA and Ph.D students from some of the most prestigious universities across Canada and the US. As part of the process, students were asked to submit a written business plan to judges ahead of a thirty-minute presentation and question period.

Each business plan featured a meaningfully unique product that could help make a difference in our health and our world. Plans included detailed financials, and all four teams had taken steps to protect their intellectual property.

That being said, there were two areas where I saw challenges with their plans. Interestingly, they are the same challenges that many organizations have when they consider new innovations…

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Giving feedback is not coaching

Posted by on March 7, 2016 1:42 pm
whistle

There’s a general assumption that any interaction with your team in relation to their work is coaching. A successful client call followed up with praise? Coaching. Giving someone direction or “advice” on a project? Coaching. Changing an employee’s unfavorable behavior to be a better fit for the organization? Coaching.

While all of the above is necessary as part of managing and leading people, it’s not actually coaching – it’s feedback. If leaders truly want to lead and transform their teams, coaching is an indispensable tool. A recent Forbes article drives home the purpose of coaching and explains it like this:

 Coaching focuses on helping another person learn in ways that let him or her keep growing afterward. It is based on asking rather than telling, on provoking thought rather than giving directions and on holding a person accountable for his or her goals.

If you’re ready to transform your team, let’s talk about why coaching is key:

1. Coaching focuses on growth and development.

Often feedback is linked directly to an individual’s performance. It offers quick hits of encouragement, advice or correction directly related to their performance of a job. Coaching, on the other hand, focuses on helping an individual grow. Period. However, we want to make sure that the growth of the individual supports the strategic direction of the organization. There is a direct relation between individual development and business results. Coaching looks at long-term development of people that inevitably results in long-term business results.

2. Coaching is based on asking rather than telling.

I don’t know about you, but I’m not a huge fan of people telling me what to do. Feedback often focuseswhistle on telling people what to do more of or less of. Coaching focuses on asking questions – lots of them. Not for YOUR sake – but for the sake of the individual you’re coaching. The art of asking a question and pausing to wait for a response is a craft that takes time to be mastered. This craft is well worth the energy because it’s in the pause that your team member will be able to think, reflect and respond. That’s where the magic happens.

3. Coaching holds a person accountable for his or her goals.

The coach works together with the employee to set meaningful goals that align their success with business results. Part of creating the goals is identifying the specific behaviors for meeting those goals. The role of the coach is not just to encourage, but to check in regularly with a rhythm of accountability to make sure the employee stays on track. We talk a lot about rhythm of accountability here at inVision and it truly is the biggest success tool in goal execution. It’s this regular check in that differentiates coaching from feedback. Feedback is usually “in the moment” and happens in no regular rhythm.

4. Coaching is based on trust.

Trust is the foundational work of an effective coaching relationship. The individual being coached must trust that your intentions in the coaching process are focused on their development, and that your gain from this relationship is first and foremost their achievement of their goals. This takes a lot of thought and self-awareness on the part of the leader. Building a trusting relationship takes time, effort and genuine interest.

Surrounding yourself with growing, passionate employees is the quickest way to get sustainable business results. Coaching employees to recognize their own opportunities and drive towards their own goals is a rewarding process as a leader.

The greatness of a leader is measured by the achievements of the led.  This is the ultimate test of his effectiveness.

Gen. Omar Bradley

There’s a general assumption that any interaction with your team in relation to their work is coaching. A successful client call followed up with praise? Coaching. Giving someone direction or “advice” on a project? Coaching. Changing an employee’s unfavorable behavior to be a better fit for the organization? Coaching.

While all of the above is necessary as part of managing and leading people, it’s not actually coaching – it’s feedback. If leaders truly want to lead and transform their teams, coaching is an indispensable tool.

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inVision CEO John Ferris guests on The Champion Entrepreneur

Posted by on February 29, 2016 9:07 am
TCEcover170x170

TCEcover170x170inVision Edge CEO John Ferris recently had the opportunity to sit down with host Anthony Lee Witt and share theinVision Edge story on The Champion Entrepreneur podcast. Learn about the philosophies and principles that have guided, and continue to shape, inVision from its founder.  Click here to listen.

 

 

 

 

 

inVision CEO John Ferris recently had the opportunity to sit down with host Anthony Lee Witt and share theinVision Edge story on The Champion Entrepreneur podcast. Learn about the philosophies and principles that have guided, and continue to shape, inVision from its founder.

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It’s time to talk about Canada’s innovation crisis

Posted by on February 24, 2016 12:07 pm
maple leaf

To all Canadian CEOs, Executives, Business Owners and Leaders,

The Conference Board of Canada reports that we continue to fall behind on innovation as a country. In fact, a recent report states:maple leaf

  • Despite a decade or so of innovation agendas and prosperity reports, Canada remains near the bottom of its peer group on innovation, ranking 13th among the 16 peer countries.
  • Countries that are more innovative are passing Canada on measures such as income per capita, productivity, and the quality of social programs.
  • So far, there are no conclusive answers—or solutions—to Canada’s poor innovation ranking.

In addition, in a recent Globe and Mail article, the Canadian business approach to innovation is described as follows:

In our tolerant, mild-mannered way, we simply acquiesce to mediocrity. We shrug our shoulders, because there is no real option.

As a proud Canadian businessman dedicated to innovation, I am not okay with being ranked 13th in a pool of 16 of our peer countries. And by working with leading CEOs and executives who are driving innovation, I confidently know that there are conclusive answers, solutions and options to make innovation happen in our companies and improve our standing.

In the companies that we work with, the key secret ingredient to successfully driving and achieving innovation is the leader. It starts at the top – 100% of the time.

It can seem like an overwhelming undertaking, but leaders who want to drive innovation in their organization can start with these steps:

  1. Commit to innovation as being the key strategy for growth;
  2. Implement an innovation system that engages all employees;
  3. Align and engage leadership with an accountability to deliver tangible innovation results.

The good news in all of this is that you are in control of your innovation story. We can do this! I challenge you to join me on a mission to drive Canada closer to the top spot for innovation: one leader, one company, one city, and one province at a time.

Let’s finally give the Globe and Mail and the Conference Board of Canada something new to report.

Your Canadian partner in innovation,

John Ferris, CEO
inVision Edge

 

 

To all Canadian CEOs, Executives, Business Owners and Leaders,

The Conference Board of Canada reports that we continue to fall behind on innovation as a country. In fact, a recent report states:

  • Despite a decade or so of innovation agendas and prosperity reports, Canada remains near the bottom of its peer group on innovation, ranking 13th among the 16 peer countries.
  • Countries that are more innovative are passing Canada on measures such as income per capita, productivity, and the quality of social programs.
  • So far, there are no conclusive answers—or solutions—to Canada’s poor innovation ranking.
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Learning to dance to the rhythm of accountability

Posted by on February 16, 2016 10:17 am
Dancing_Footprints

Prior to joining inVision, I had never participated in a strategic planning session. The 2015-16 session marked my second year (you can read about the process here). In a nutshell, during the session we develop the organization’s overall direction for the coming year. We develop objectives that address each goal, and action plans follow. Each team member takes a piece of the plan, putting their name on it and assuming responsibility for it. That doesn’t mean that it’s up to you alone to accomplish it; it means that you have ultimate ownership over that objective and responsibility to make sure it’s completed successfully.

We’ve talked in various blog posts about the importance of setting the rhythm of accountability as part of the strategic plan. Basically, the rhythm ensures that the plan is kept top of mind and doesn’t lose out to competing priorities during the year. During our monthly and quarterly meetings, we provide updates to our team members on our part of the plan. We put it all on the table – the milestones and challenges, the progress and delays.Dancing_Footprints

What happened during this month’s meeting was a first for me. Why, you ask? Because I had to let my team know that I hadn’t made any progress on my portion of our strategic plan. Talk about humbling. My other priorities (which we call the “daily whirlwind of activity”) had won out. I had let myself slip into that whirlwind, and it wasn’t until the days leading up to our monthly meeting that I realized that I hadn’t stepped out of it to focus on the strategic plan.

So with my admission out in the open, the time had come to step up and formulate a plan to get things back on track. I sat down with Wendy, my manager, to refocus and develop a clear set of actions to move the plan forward and hit the deadlines I had set for myself.

My point in all of this? In this case, our rhythm of accountability did exactly what it’s designed to do: it pulled me from the whirlwind, forced me to face the fact that I hadn’t made any progress on my plan, and motivated me to get back on track with actionable items I could start tackling right away. Sometimes it’s tough to stay on top of everything; but the key is to step back, assess the situation, and take action. My original deadlines are still in place; now, it’s a matter of refocusing and getting down to work. Lesson learned.

 

 

Prior to joining inVision, I had never participated in a strategic planning session. The 2015-16 session marked my second year (you can read about the process here). In a nutshell, during the session we develop the organization’s overall direction for the coming year. We develop objectives that address each goal, and action plans follow. Each team member takes a piece of the plan, putting their name on it and assuming responsibility for it. That doesn’t mean that it’s up to you alone to accomplish it; it means that you have ultimate ownership over that objective and responsibility to make sure it’s completed successfully.

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Execution is about LIVING the plan, not communicating it

Posted by on February 8, 2016 11:49 am

Too often, senior leaders start the year with a big town hall meeting to ‘present’ the organization’s strategic plan, if they share it at all.  They give a state of the union address and summarize the high level strategies and objectives. When the meeting is finished, executives feel good that they have shared the plan and everyone is now accountable for executing and attaining success. It sounds great, but it isn’t reality.

The truth is that the vast majority of employees leave those meetings more confused than when they arrived. The strategies are at such a high level that employees don’t know what they do to contribute, so many, while appreciative of the break from their day jobs, don’t leave the meeting engaged in driving the plan.

But what if we could change that? What if we could take those high level strategies and objectives and help people see how their roles contribute every day?  What if we could, in our regular interactions with employees, reinforce how they make a difference? That, my friends, is how we drive execution.

As an executive, I used to love the start of a new year. My favourite week to work was the one between Christmas and New Year’s as it gave me a lot of time to reflect and get ready for what was ahead. I would invest two days on setting the course for my team and determining how to drive execution of our strategic plan and key objectives. I know, it seems like a lot of time, but I have learned that investing the time up front makes life easier in the long run.

So…what did I do for those two days? It’s simple. I put myself in the shoes of my direct reports and figured out how their work contributed to the success of the plan, particularly those whose roles were further removed from the high level objectives being targeted.

An example: let’s say a company wanted to strategically improve its ability to retain and build existing customer relationships. They want to measure progress by showing a 10% improvement in their annual customer satisfaction scores year over year.

Of course we can see how those two elements link.  The question is, even if we communicate this to our teams, do they know what to do to get the 10% improvement? The answer is, not likely; particularly if they work in a function that is removed from customer service.

What if I’m the HR Leader? Without more conversation, it is easy for folks in indirect roles like this to disengage; customer service is someone else’s issue in the organization, not mine. If we want to achieve aggressive strategic plans, we need everyone in our organization working towards key objectives.

For some it is easy to see how they can impact the metric (ex. front line customer service staff), but for others, they need the link established for them. Let’s look at the HR Leader. By reducing hire times, and hiring for the right skills, the HR Leader can contribute to the customer service goal. Ongoing conversations help develop the direct link between what we are asking the leader to accomplish and the strategic plans for the organization.

Why do these conversations drive execution?

  • People want to work on things that matter.  If employees understand how the work they do contributes to the overall objective, they are more likely to engage and commit to reaching that result.
  • Objectives are measurable. Because we can measure progress, we can monitor progress. We can recognize strong performance and jump in quickly if things go off track.
  • Scope creep is minimized. Through the year, it is inevitable that employees will be asked to take on new projects.  Ongoing dialogue ensures a balance between strategic objectives and “day job” responsibilities.
  • Performance management becomes easier. Setting clear expectations at the beginning of the year means that we get commitment on the work to be done and we can better monitor progress throughout the year. We provide appropriate feedback early, leading to better communication and fewer surprises when it comes to coaching and year end reviews.

If you really want to get results, invest a bit of time in having regular conversations with your staff that makes the strategic plan real to them. I guarantee you the investment will pay off in spades and you will be that much closer to achieving your strategic plan.

 

Too often, senior leaders start the year with a big town hall meeting to ‘present’ the organization’s strategic plan, if they share it at all.  They give a state of the union address and summarize the high level strategies and objectives. When the meeting is finished, executives feel good that they have shared the plan and everyone is now accountable for executing and attaining success. It sounds great, but it isn’t reality.

The truth is that the vast majority of employees leave those meetings more confused than when they arrived. The strategies are at such a high level that employees don’t know what they do to contribute, so many, while appreciative of the break from their day jobs, don’t leave the meeting engaged in driving the plan.

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Relying on high performers to drive your strategy execution? Think again.

Posted by on January 26, 2016 9:51 am
goal speedometer

Leadership teams are under a lot of pressure to do more with less and get more impressive results with fewer resources. Traditionally, leadership creates a strategic plan, talks about the plans around the executive table, and relies on the people in their organizations to help reach the goals. Most organizations treat the performance management system as the driver to reach the strategic goals.

This article on LinkedIn reports that in “a public survey carried out by Deloitte, 58% of executives surveyed ‘believe that their current performance management approach drives neither employee engagement nor high performance’.” That’s crazy! If our leaders, the people responsible for driving organizational success, are not seeing tangible business results from an internal process – then why are they doing it?

My answer: Because we’ve been told that if we’re managing the performance of employees – making sure everyone is performing at the right level – then we should reach our organizational goals. If only it were that simple!

Don’t get me wrong – I believe that the right performance management system is an ingredient in creating a system that helps us measure an individual’s progress. However, when it comes to driving the achievement of the goals in an organizational strategic plan, relying solely on performance management to do it is not a sound approach. It’s about activating leaders to clearly articulate the plan and gain buy-in from the rest of the team. We can employ the highest performers in the industry, but if they don’t have radical clarity on “what’s” important and the “why” that drives organization, they’re not going to be doing the right “how”.

However, when we have a team of people operating at their highest level of talent, engagement, and passion, and then we ensure they’re aligned in strategy and direction, we get big results. We drive success and hit our strategic goals. From my experience, there are three key ingredients to executing and activating a strategic plan:goal speedometer

  1. Radical clarity. Be radically clear with your team on what the organization’s strategic goals are. Then be clear about what part of this plan their department is responsible for (assign accountability). Ask them: what goals and actions do we need to include to meet our responsibilities? For example: What actions are they personally responsible for to help their department to reach these goals?
  1. Learn how to coach. How often do you find yourself sitting face to face with your team member and you end up directing or “managing” rather than coaching? Here’s a quick way to tell which one you’re doing: Do a silent self-check in your meeting and ask yourself who’s doing most of the talking. If it’s you – chances are you’re managing or directing. Try asking more questions like “Tell me what you’d do in this situation?” and “What would you do differently next time?” or “What did you learn?” There are a lot of great coaching resources out there, but one of the best ways to learn is to be coached yourself. (Contact us to find out how we can help you by being your executive coach!).
  1. Create accountability. Now that you and your employees know what the expectations are and you feel confident in how to coach them, set up a rhythm of regular coaching sessions. These sessions create accountability to make sure goals stay on track. Here at inVision, we call it “rhythm of accountability”. Weekly, monthly, or quarterly meetings make sure we’re on track to meet our results.

There is a time and a place for traditional performance management systems. But to be innovative, focused, and strategic you need more. The three steps I’ve outlined above can easily be implemented within any organization that has a clear strategic plan. If you don’t have a strategic plan or need help clarifying an existing one, let us know – we’d love to help! If you have some questions on how to execute on the steps above, give us a call – we’ll get you heading in the right direction before the call is over.

 

 

Leadership teams are under a lot of pressure to do more with less and get more impressive results with fewer resources. Traditionally, leadership creates a strategic plan, talks about the plans around the executive table, and relies on the people in their organizations to help reach the goals. Most organizations treat the performance management system as the driver to reach the strategic goals.

This article on LinkedIn reports that in “a public survey carried out by Deloitte, 58% of executives surveyed ‘believe that their current performance management approach drives neither employee engagement nor high performance’.” That’s crazy! If our leaders, the people responsible for driving organizational success, are not seeing tangible business results from an internal process – then why are they doing it?

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Future’s so bright, gotta wear shades

Posted by on January 20, 2016 8:49 am
Sunglasses

We have the best job in the world: we enable leaders and their organizations innovate and transform.

Through our work with so many amazing leaders and their companies, it has become clear that there are three key ingredients for sustained innovation and transformation:Sunglasses

  • Radical clarity of direction of your company and relentless execution towards a common purpose (Navigate)
  • A system that enables innovation with everyone, everywhere, every day (Innovate)
  • Aligned leadership so all are engaged and accountable (Activate)

When we see the great things that our clients are doing, it inspires us to do better and be better. We continue to focus on building our inVision Crew while bringing on board like-minded teammates who want to make a difference and do great things. We have worked together to craft our areas of focus and wanted to share them with you.

To continue to innovate and transform ourselves at inVision, we’ve chosen the following areas to focus on in 2016:

  • We will continue our quest to enable innovation and transformation by partnering with like-minded companies across Canada;
  • We will launch our brand new execution-focused website, which provides leaders and their teams with a way to track and execute on goals and actions that enable the rhythm of accountability;
  • We are developing a client/partner onboarding program and on-going communication approach to ensure we are 100% aligned to the innovation and transformation goals of our clients;
  • We are developing our very own facilitator training program to ensure that our clients receive the very best training on how to deliver immediate and sustained results.;
  • Innovation Engineering Labs will have numerous updates to assist our clients on their innovation journey.

It is an honour to partner with so many great companies and our entire team looks forward to what lies ahead. Here’s to another year of Doing Great Things! Now time to get those shades out…. and give us a shout if you want to learn more.

 

 

We have the best job in the world: we enable leaders and their organizations innovate and transform.

Through our work with so many amazing leaders and their companies, it has become clear that there are three key ingredients for sustained innovation and transformation:

  • Radical clarity of direction of your company and relentless execution towards a common purpose (Navigate)
  • A system that enables innovation with everyone, everywhere, every day (Innovate)
  • Aligned leadership so all are engaged and accountable (Activate)
Read More
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